The Year of Faith 2012 to 2013

Year of Faith 2012 to 2013 logoReaders of my Universe column (there are a few) probably think I have nothing left to say about the Year of Faith which begins today; so forgive me if you find I am repeating myself. Like all ‘years’ and ‘days’, this one is meant to focus attention on something we tend to take for granted or notice only subliminally. Unlike others, however, the Year of Faith is meant to bring about a change within ourselves not just in society round about. It is an invitation to deepen our faith and, crucially, explore what that faith means. That is why I have been encouraging people not only to pray, receive the sacraments and read the scriptures but also to read the Catechism of the Catholic Church. I am sometimes troubled by the imperfect understanding of what the Church actually teaches, as distinct from what people think the Church teaches, and I’m sorry to say that Catholics are themselves often among the worst offenders! We are not all called to be theologians or scripture scholars, but Catholicism is a reasonable religion and deserves serious study by anyone who professes to be an adherent. We may envy the apparently simple faith of the peasant of history, but we are not peasants, nor are we living in times past. We are men and women of the twenty-first century and our faith must reflect that. So, if you haven’t yet done anything about setting yourself a reading programme for the year, try Matthew Warner’s Catechism Reading venture here (link opens in new window).

And what if you feel even that is beyond you? If you are tired of all these initiatives and feel rather useless in the face of all the recommendations to do this, that and the other? If your faith is already such as to move, not mountains, but maybe a few molehills of doubt and difficulty? Can I say simply: pray. Prayer is the most powerful way of opening ourselves to  the grace of the Holy Spirit and allowing him to flood both understanding and will with his grace. I liked what Archbishop Rowan Williams said in his address to the Synod of Bishops on the subject of the new evangelisation in Rome. If you haven’t yet read it, you can do so here (link opens in new window).

What shall we be doing in community? We have committed ourselves to extra prayer throughout the year, and if we can scrape together enough money, we shall be uploading a completely revised set of community websites (see links to existing sites  in sidebar) which will contain a number of ways to explore and, hopefully, deepen faith. Ultimately however, we need to remember that faith is a gift. It can be asked for, received, celebrated, but it can never be forced. Part of what we need to learn this year is to wait on the Lord, for he alone is God.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Keeping Faith

There has been a lot of comment on the Pope’s Memo regarding the Year of Faith (2012). Some of it has reminded me how grateful I am that this blog has never, as far as I know, become a battleground for conservatives and liberals, never ‘Catholic’ in the narrowly partisan sense, but has always been enriched by contributions from many differing Christian and non-Christian traditions. Yet I trust that no one reading it would have the slightest doubt that I write as a Catholic, from a Catholic perspective born of study of scripture and the Fathers and that immersion in prayer which is at the heart of monastic life. Some, I know, would prefer to see a more overtly theological stance or more explicit discussion of liturgy, but I think I can safely leave that to others. I am more concerned with the foothills of Christian living, and for that reason I am looking forward to what the coming year will bring.

The Year of Faith promises much, but if there is one aspect I would want to emphasize, it is this. All theological disciplines, every attempt to articulate or express faith, should begin, and end, in prayer. Only prayer can keep us centred on Christ and in charity with one another, because only prayer can enable us to face the truth of God and of ourselves. No one, having seen him- or herself for what he or she truly is, could ever despise or disparage another. The Year of Faith is not an opportunity for neighbour-bashing in the name of religion but for learning how much further we each have to go to realise our vocation of holiness. Keeping faith will also keep us humble.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail