Gaudete: the art of rejoicing

Gaudete Sunday, with its rose vestments, musical instruments, and general air of rejoicing, marks a further stage on our pilgrimage to Christmas, but have you ever stopped to think what ‘rejoicing’ actually means? Is there an art of rejoicing that we have to learn or can we simply laugh a great laugh and be joyful in His presence? A bit of both perhaps.

I have been pondering that lyrical first reading from Isaiah 61. It is often used at monastic Clothings because of the reference to the ‘garments of salvation’. When I was clothed, my father sent me a small card on which he had inscribed not ‘he has clothed me in the garments of salvation’ but ‘he has wrapped me in the cloak of integrity’. To anyone who did not know him, my father’s choice might have seemed puzzling. Why prefer the cloak of integrity to the garments of salvation? I think it has to do with the obligation that integrity lays upon us and the freedom and joy that fidelity to vocation confer. We cannot stretch the metaphor too far, but the garments of salvation are a sign of gladness of heart, a gift from the Lord, but to be wrapped in integrity is to assume a duty, that of being prophets in our own generation. Integrity is never very comfortable and will always lead to difficult and demanding situations. It is no accident that St John the Baptist was a man of the utmost integrity. He was also one of the most joyful. May he teach us not only how to be people of integrity but also the art of rejoicing.

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A Voice Crying

Isaiah’s image of a voice crying in the wilderness is one of the most evocative in scripture. No wonder that John the Baptist allowed himself to be merely the voice that precedes the Word. I often think that a blogger must also be just a voice: the message to be proclaimed, the essential Word, comes from the Holy Spirit. Our business is not to get in the way of that Word, not to falsify it, not to shrink it to our own comfortable assumptions about how things should be.

Reading again Isaiah chapter 40 this morning, I was reminded how the tenderness of God is not inconsistent with a wilderness experience, with huge efforts, much patience and uncertainty about results. We are called to make a highway for God in our hearts, and that means some exhausting labour to level the mountains of pride and fill in the valleys of fear. Those of us who blog from our Christian experience must expect it to involve us in hard work, misunderstandings at time, results quite the opposite of what we intended or hoped for: a kind of be-wilderment in fact. But we know that it was in the wilderness that Israel found God; that being a voice is important because we have the greatest of all messages to proclaim, Jesus Christ our Lord.

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Birthday of St John the Baptist

St John the Baptist tends to be a great favourite among monks and nuns. His humility, courage, joyful asceticism and fiery proclamation of the Truth are immensely appealing. I have written so much about him in the past that I feel obliged to limit this post to a single thought.

Jesus, Mary and John were related by blood and possibly shared a few character traits along with their DNA. We are accustomed to thinking about Christ in isolation, save for a few incidents where Mother-and-Child interaction reminds us that he did indeed live as a family member for most of his life. Where was John, his slightly elder contemporary? In boyhood, did Jesus look up to John; or was Jesus always the leader? Did they play together at family gatherings, or were Elizabeth and Zechariah not the mixing types? The family life of Jesus began in Bethlehem. Today’s feast reminds us that it did not end there.

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Gaudete Sunday Distractions

My thoughts wandered during the homily today, and I found myself wondering, yet again, what it was that gave both Jesus and his forerunner, John the Baptist, such power over people. I suspect the “correct” answer is love or compassion; but part of me can’t let go the notion that it was truth that set them apart from others and at the same time drew others to them.

Integrity, being truthful in every aspect of one’s being, is a difficult quality. We admire it but often find it impossible to live with, either in ourselves or in others. Yet without integrity, all the other qualities we find attractive can easily become much less than they should be. Love, for example, can become mere sentimentality or, even worse, a form of self-gratification (“I do like to watch myself being loving and compassionate”).

There was in both Jesus and John something uncompromising, something utterly truthful. If we can have a share in that truthfulness of theirs, we can indeed rejoice.

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Humility and Assurance

St John the Baptist by El Greco
St John the Baptist

On the Second Sunday of Advent our eyes are on John the Baptist. What a strange mixture of humility and assurance he is. Or rather, how his humility confounds our ideas about both.

It was precisely because John was so humble that he could be so assured. Like Moses in the Old Testament, he was “the humblest man on earth”; and his humility and assurance came, like Moses’, from his sense of the nearness of his God.

One who is close to God tends to see as God sees, and that perspective is utterly transforming. John looked at the world, saw the beauty and holiness of its Creator and wanted everyone and everything to share that transforming vision. Hence his passion and his joy, his severity and tenderness. He could not contain himself, so near was our salvation. If he were silent, the very stones would speak. “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

This Advent the grace of sharing that transforming vision, of repenting, of turning again to God, is offered to each of us, if we will but accept it. Only the molehills of pride and self-sufficiency stand in the way, but we know how easily we stumble over them. Let’s ask St John the Baptist, with his humility and assurance, to show us the right path. For, as he himself would say, there is no other Way but One, Jesus Christ our Lord.

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