Remembering 7 July 7 Years After

Few of us would dare to claim that we remember anything ‘exactly’ but certain events stay in the mind with distressing clarity. So it is with the events of 7 July 2005. Whether we were personally caught up in the horror of that day or merely experienced it at second-hand through the media, no one who lived through it is likely to forget the impact it had. The IRA bomb attacks of the 70s were somehow in a different league. This was terror perpetrated by British citizens in the name of God. We were on new ground, but it seemed to be shifting beneath our feet.

Seven years on, have we learned any lessons? We live with the fact of terrorism, not merely the threat, and many of us would probably admit that we don’t really know how to respond. The grief and pain of those who survived 7/7 cannot be magicked away, anymore than the dead can be forgotten; but there must surely be something we can do to ensure that death and destruction are not allowed to become the whole story. For myself I think the only answer is to try to root out violence from our own hearts: the anger, the thirst for revenge, the negativity about others. Otherwise, as René Girard has argued again and again, we are destined to pass the poison on. Let us not add another tragedy to that which has already occurred.

Note
Forgiveness is never easy, but ‘getting even’ isn’t a Christian response. We may not have to confront terrorism head on, but we all have people/events that make us angry. How we deal with the anger is important. We can either add to the stock of violence in the world or reduce it.

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Significant Anniversaries

Yesterday was the forty-eighth anniversary of Pacem in Terris, Pope John XXIII’s important encyclical on world peace and justice; today is the fiftieth anniversary of Yuri Gagarin’s space-flight. Half a century ago we worrying about a nuclear conflict between the west and the Soviet Union but we had great faith in the ability of science to help create a better world.  We still believed in progress. Today we are worrying about nuclear leaks from Fukushima and watching the violence in Africa and the Middle East with an uneasy sense that maybe, just maybe, climate change and the pressure on natural resources may prove to be even more damaging to human life and happiness. We are not sure what we believe any more, are we?

I am tempted to say that I suspect it has always been so, that every generation has its own fears and dark terrors that may look a little exaggerated to the next. The twentieth century should have brought peace and prosperity to more people than ever before in history. It didn’t; it brought war and death and deprivation on a scale previously unknown. I am sceptical about the way in which we recall some events, the way we pile up anniversary on anniversary without necessarily distinguishing between them. ‘Those who do not learn the lessons of history are fated to repeat them.’ Perhaps. Sometimes I wonder whether the trouble is that we are too busy marking and partying in the name of celebration to do the learning.

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