1500 Posts and Counting

For my 1500th blog post on iBenedictines, I thought I’d do something a little different and write about my readers. After all, what is the point of writing if no one reads? I don’t mean that the posts that attract the most attention are the most worthwhile — there are a number on here and on its predecessor Colophon that have been read by comparatively few — rather that unless a blog makes an effort to engage with people it really is no more than private journaling, which, as we all know, can be a trifle self-indulgent. It is the readers who make the effort of blogging worthwhile, who help determine the shape the blog takes and who ultimately spur one on to continue even when energy flags and inspiration seems sadly to seek. Sometimes it is not the most carefully crafted post that speaks to others but the apparently banal. And that is good to remember, because I blog as a Catholic and know that anything anyone finds of value here is the work of the Holy Spirit — and the Spirit is often more obvious in the comments than in the posts themselves.

So, who are my readers and why do I care about them? They come from all walks of life and from various faith traditions (or none). For years I had a charming Buddhist monk who rarely commented on the blog itself, and then only under a pseudonym, but who sent me thoughtful emails that I really had to think about before I dared reply. He has now withdrawn into deeper solitude and given up the use of the internet. I miss him. Then there are the F.C.s, the frequent commenters, a lovely bunch who sometimes write comments twice as long as the original post but who dare to share much of their own experience with a humility and frankness I find both touching and inspiring. There are the B.B.s, the belligerent battleaxes, who occasionally swoop down and deal what they hope is a knock-out blow but who often find themselves wrong-footed by one of the F.C.s. I like to think that this blog provides a safe space where people can say what they like provided they observe the two guiding principles: no personal attacks and no profanity or blasphemous language. The B.B.s thwart these principles at their peril, for I am not above using the moderator’s power to edit out a nasty gibe or refuse to permit a comment that is libellous.

I admit to great fondness for the S.L.s, the silent lurkers, who, from time to time, will shyly emerge from their hidden places in cyberspace and add a comment or share a reflection that is nothing less than pure gold. If only they realised how much they give to others, especially me! I am also very fond of the O.Q.s, the open questioners, who ask for explanations and ways of probing deeper into the subject on hand. Often they inspire further reflection or even radical rethinking of a position previously held. Bless them for it! Then there are the C.E.s, the constant encouragers, without whom no blogger would persist very long. They include a surprising number of agnostics and atheists who regard questions of faith as valid matter for discussion and argument and do so with a courtesy and a thoroughness that puts us all in their debt.

Finally, of course, there are the D.L.s, the dog-lovers, who read Bro Duncan PBGV’s posts while he was here on earth and now follow his and Bro Dyfrig BFdeB’s correspondence now that he is Beyond. Where would we be without you?

For all my readers, I am grateful. Please go on being as interesting, thoughtful, challenging and sometimes infuriating as you have been. Then I can continue to blog.

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