Limping Into Lent

Ash Wednesday is only a week away, and I realise I shall probably still be in the throes of post-chemo yukkiness while everyone else is smiling bright, purposeful smiles as they tackle their Lenten penances. Thank goodness we Benedictines don’t go in for that sort of thing. I can limp into Lent with a good conscience. St Benedict does indeed say that the life of a monk should always have a Lenten quality, but when one analyses what he means by ‘Lenten’ it is reassuring to find that he concentrates on purity of life and the basic disciplines of Lent — prayer, fasting and almsgiving — but without any competitive striving. We are not being asked to be heroic, just fully what we should be at all times but often aren’t. (cf RB 49)

In previous years, I have examined what some of the traditional disciplines of Lent might mean for each of us and I see no reason to change anything I’ve said before, though it may be useful to re-state them.

Prayer
Prayer is the fundamental Lenten discipline because Lent is all about letting God become close to us. Sometimes people decide that ‘more is better’ and set themselves a daunting routine of extra prayers to be said each day. I think myself that that is self-defeating. Either one cannot keep it up, in which case one feels a fraud and a failure, or one does somehow manage it, and is tempted to sneak a little admiring glance at oneself now and then. Much better just to be simple and try to be whole-hearted about one’s prayer as it is.

For a Benedictine, prayer is intimately connected with lectio divina, and in the past I have written about the usefulness of the Lent Book — the book of scripture each of us is given to read during Lent. Not, please note, one we have chosen for ourselves but one we have been given, the one that, however unpromising it may look to us, has something important to say. If we do not have a kindly superior or community to choose a Lent book for us, there is always the rich sequence of readings to be found in the Mass lectionary. In fact, I would always suggest starting with them, because to pray with the rest of the Church is the best way of ensuring that we do not go off on some unfruitful byway of our own.

Fasting
Fasting, like prayer, is best done with the mind of the Church. It isn’t the same as dieting, and giving up what Isaiah calls ‘the wicked word’ is much more important than some trifling sacrifice of wine or chocolate that half the world cannot afford anyway. It is, however, necessary to introduce an element of plainness into our food, and to curb the self-indulgence of other times. Whatever we save in our spending on food here at the monastery goes to a relief agency, and I think that is important. Fasting is meant to simplify our life and make us more attentive to God and other people. Feeling in one’s own body a little of the hunger that many experience daily is good at many levels, but it must not get in the way of spiritual alertness or the practice of charity. So, if fasting becomes just a covert way of improving one’s waistline or one’s bank balance, stop, think again. And if fasting turns one into an angry, hot-tempered dragon, belting fire and brimstone at all and sundry, stop, stop, STOP! Better to eat a slice of bread one didn’t intend to than chew one’s brethren to bits.

As to the other things St Benedict suggests we might fast from — unnecessary conversations that can easily turn into gossip or scurrility, for example — we must each find our own way. For some people, it might even be a case of becoming more, rather than less, conversational: greeting the concierge with a smile and a kind word, for example, rather than passing them by as though they did not exist.

Almsgiving
It is telling how often, in the West, almsgiving as a Lenten discipline is forgotten. It is not that people are not generous, but somehow the connection between giving alms — showing love — and the pilgrimage towards Easter is broken or not understood. We are all capable of giving to others, and often it is giving what we never thought of giving that proves the most costly gift of all. So, for example, being patient, with ourselves as well as others, is as valuable as a monetary gift to a Charity that appeals for help. Not being able to do some of the things we’d like to do during Lent can be an offering in itself. For instance, I doubt I shall be well enough to fast ‘properly’ on Ash Wednesday, but I can offer my sadness and regret instead. Again, we must each find our own way; and that brings me to my main point.

Preparing for Lent
For each and every one of us, Lent will be much more fruitful if we spend a little time beforehand thinking and praying about it by way of preparation. In the monastery we have the wonderful practice of the Lent Bill in which we set out what we intend to do (or not do!) during Lent and show it to another for evaluation and permission. I think that helps keep us on the right track. We do not always see ourselves clearly enough to make wise decisions. To ask the advice of another, to be humble about our choices, is to enter into the dynamic of Lent. For forty days we are asked to accompany the Lord along the way to Jerusalem and we cannot do that unless we are prepared to follow rather than lead. Some of us will run along the way; others will limp. It doesn’t matter which, provided we get there in the end.

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Lent Book 2017

An important part of a Benedictine’s experience of Lent is the so-called Lent Book, given out at the beginning of Lent by the superior of the community and to be read ‘straight through, in its entirety ‘ (RB 48. 14–16). We cannot be sure whether St Benedict intended the book to be one of scripture or some other codex from the library. I think myself he probably meant scripture, because the instructions he gives for the way in which it is to be read (per ordinem ex integro), and the care with which senior monks are instructed to ensure that everyone takes this duty seriously (et videant ne forte inveniatur frater acediosus, etc) suggests we are dealing with something inherently holy, the practice of lectio divina in its purest form.

There are two point to note: the choice is made for us by another, and the reading we are to do is situated in Benedict’s chapter on daily manual work. In other words, our Lent Book, if received with faith and goodwill, will be something the Lord desires us to hear, not necessarily what we want to hear — and we’ll have to work at it. That doesn’t mean we scurry to the nearest commentary or exegetical essay, though they are good and useful adjuncts to study. Rather, it means that we should take time over the text, praying beforehand that the Holy Spirit will illumine our understanding, seeking to take away a word or phrase that we can meditate on through the course of the day, and always ending with a prayer of thanksgiving, no matter how dry, barren and apparently pointless the whole process has seemed to us to be.

This year, for various reasons, I am unable to make individual recommendations, but here at the monastery we shall be reading I and II Corinthians. St Paul wrote more to the church in Corinth than to anyone else and the problems he had to deal with are distressingly familiar: disunity in the Church; questions about morality and how far a Christian should or could accommodate to the prevailing mores of a cosmopolitan society; what love means in practice as well as theory; the reality of the Resurrection and the true nature of Christ. There is a lot there on which to ponder as we make our way towards Holy Week and the joy of Easter. Perhaps you, too, would like to join us in our lectio divina.Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail