Betrayal | Spy Wednesday 2019

To be betrayed by those we love, to be let down by those in whom we have placed our trust, is agonizing. It is also agonizing to know that we have betrayed others, let them down, been the cause of their suffering. For Judas, as for Jesus, there was a price to pay for what followed after he went out into the night.

Judas is such an equivocal figure but there is something of Judas in all of us. We see in him the type of everyman (or woman); and his fate and ours are bound up together. On the one hand he has been demonised as the arch-betrayer; on the other he is seen as playing a necessary role in redemption. Holy Week, and Spy Wednesday in particular, bring this ambiguity into sharp focus. Once again we must decide where we stand.

I must admit to worrying about Judas and his ultimate fate, mainly because of all that bad press he has had through the centuries. I like best the answer the Lord gave Catherine of Siena in the Dialogues: she was told that mercy was possible even for Judas. Which means that mercy is possible even for you and me and those we find difficult to love. Wonderful thought!

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A Royal Wedding

Later today Prince William and Catherine Middleton will marry at Westminster Abbey. Judging by the amount of media attention this event has already attracted, one can confidently predict that there will be no shortage of instant experts to comment on everything, from the bride’s dress to the security arrangements. Mention of security arrangements does highlight the fact that this is not an ‘ordinary’ marriage but one that will be lived out in the glare of publicity. Very few of us could survive such scrutiny and, sadly, the British royal family’s marital history is not encouraging: there have been many breakdowns, with attendant sadnesses for everyone concerned. All the more reason, then, for us to pray for William and Catherine on their wedding day.

In 1366 another Catherine, a Dominican Tertiary, experienced a ‘mystical marriage’ with Jesus which transformed her life. She began to serve the poor and take an interest in world affairs, becoming in time a fierce critic of clerical mores. She was an adviser of both Pope Gregory XI and Urban VI and died at the early age of 33. Her Letters and her Dialogues are both remarkable, although not to everyone’s taste. A Doctor of the Church, she is a type of the mulier fortis. Love her or loathe her, Catherine of Siena is not easily ignored. Were she alive today, I feel sure she’d be a blogger. Perhaps we women bloggers should take her as our patron?

Media Links
The video of the talks at the recent Faith 2.0: Religion and the Internet Conference has now been uploaded to YouTube.

Opening Address: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytixq3-voh0&feature=relmfu
First Panel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPETf37g9_w&feature=relmfu
Second Panel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Im1HZXoofZ8&feature=relmfu
Keynote (Digitalnun): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYI2isQaqUs&feature=relmfu Faith 2.0 video
Third Panel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_3a2hf3y0s&feature=related

And for a gentle interview between Fr Rocky and Digitalnun on Relevant Radio’s Drew Mariani Show yesterday, go here. (Starts about 2.49 and last approx 15 minutes)Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail