On Not Being Cynical by Bro Duncan PBGV

One of the things that makes me sad is cynicism. Dogs don’t do cynical. We believe the best of everybody, all the time. It doesn’t matter if sometimes we are proved wrong. We were created to trust, and we do. You’ve probably noticed that we are all eager-beaver enthusiasm, even for people you wouldn’t let inside your front door. Whenever I suspect that the Enemy of the Moment has turned up, for example, I go into ecstacies of welcome. That soon brings everyone to their senses. You can’t go on being cool towards someone we’re treating with rapture, can you?

There is an important spiritual point here. Welcoming people — really welcoming them — is not about checking whether they have all the right credentials and espouse all the right views (i.e. the same as you) before trusting them but simply seeing them as they are, as God sees them. I think dogs have the gift of always seeing people as God sees them, which is why we don’t find trust difficult. Yes, human beans can be cranky (just look at My Lot!); they can be difficult, demanding, really rather horrible at times; but underneath all that messiness, the failures, the sin, they are rather beautiful.

Cynicism distorts the way human beans see others and blinds them to their good points. In the end, it can make the cynical lonely, because no one really likes someone who is always negative and trusts no one else. Except, of course, God and us dogs. 😉

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12 thoughts on “On Not Being Cynical by Bro Duncan PBGV”

  1. I do enjoy your posts on here. I save them to enjoy with my coffee before I start work. Seriously, they are some of the best religious comments I have ever read in my life. My respect and best wishes to you all.

  2. I wonder if you could do a piece on “joy” sometime? Nothing I’ve ever seen in human beans surpasses the joy of a hound (or ordinary dog, come to that) on rejoining his/her BigBro/Sis after a brief absence! Recently I observed this every day from a hospital ward window, and it moved me deeply. Of course, total trust is involved here.

  3. Not all dogs are like you, Bro Duncan. I was hospitalized as a small child following a dog attack, badly chewed up. Some dogs are fear biters because they’ve been mistreated, same as with humans. Others are threatening because they’ve never been socialized. To gain the full measure of being a happy well adjusted dog a pooch needs to be treated well, taught how to trust and communicate. Same as with us human beans. We need to help each other learn it is possible to share a bone and play together without biting. I suspect many people are cynical because they’re afraid to let go and allow God to take the lead. Extra bikkies for you, Bro Duncan!

  4. So wise and true Bro Duncan. Am in a show at the moment with an amazing actor dog called Scruff who plays Sandy ( show is Annie ) and he is a joy to be with on and back stage. Confirms all that you have said.

  5. I was thinking that being a Pessimist is also not in a Dog’s nature, unless of course, you run out of Kibble and Charcoal Biscuits – than Pessimism might just be there with a tinge of regret. But you won’t show it, as dogs don’t normally sulk.

    But Human Beans, can do pessimism in bucket loads and also sulking – and normally take some encouragement from a Dog (or Cat – our tribe do that often) to abandon the pessimism or sulking and be restored to hope – hope in the promised kingdom, of God, which we could all be enjoying here and now, if only we had eyes to see, ears to hear and off course, bags of kibble to nibble.

  6. I brood, I mistrust, I think about revenge. But I’m told I also have a sense of humour. And can be kind (on occasion). I’m not really sure who I am.
    Thanks for your wisdom Sister and Bro Duncan.

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