Solemnity of Christ the King 2013

Last year and the year before I wrote briefly about the Solemnity of Christ the King, on each occasion choosing slightly tangential aspects of the feast because I had said more than enough about its history and theology and felt I had nothing left to say. The beauty of the liturgy, however, is that it is always new, always fresh. This morning I was struck by the thought that the kingship of Christ is eternally youthful.

In art, and in our mind’s eye, God the Father is often portrayed as a grandfather-figure with long white beard, but Christ the Lord is always young, always in his prime. We tend to associate rulership of any kind with middle/old age but this feast challenges that. Again, the Rule of St Benedict comes to my aid. In chapter three, On Summoning the Brethren for Counsel, Benedict is at pains to point out the need for the abbot to listen carefully even to the most junior monks, for they often have insights not given to their elders. It can be hard for the older monks, but our common enterprise means we must lay aside our prejudices and attend to the voice of the Spirit. As with the monastery, so with the Church. However grey-headed we may appear outwardly, inwardly the Church is always youthful for the simple reason that Christ is Lord.

Today, when we pray for the reign of God to come among us, for the restoration of all things in Christ, we are not praying for something static, for a kind of archeological reconstruction of something old and lost, we are praying for something vibrantly new, a kind of cosmic re-tuning. We are praying for Christ to come among us in all his power and glory, knowing that in Him we too will be made new.

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9 thoughts on “Solemnity of Christ the King 2013”

  1. Thank you for preparing my heart as I set off for Mass: joy and sorrow mingled, as the rest of my family go together to an evangelical church without me

  2. That is very wise. Do you know of any places where I can find study modules on St Benedicts Rule or similar that I can use for our home group? I have read various parts of the Rule on the web, such as this, and it would be really useful to discuss them with our Christian home group. Thank you in advance!

    • In addition to lots of posts here over the years, I suggest you have a look at the resources given on http://www.osb.org. I am hoping to bring out something myself in the New Year, but in such a small community, hopes are often dashed by the necessity of getting on with something urgent. 🙂

  3. Thank you so much Digitalnun. I should have thought of that in the first place. It would be lovely to read your work too, but I can imagine that you’ve plenty to do and little time.
    Congratulations on your award! Its well deserved I’m sure.
    Take care.

  4. Dear Sister

    I hate to bother you with us but I don’t know where else to turn. I am taking a course called Re=Imagining Mary and I said
    very confidently that Mary had set up house with Jesus in
    Capharnum when he began his public ministry. I know I read
    this somewhere but can’t for the life of me think where. Can
    you help me out? Am I imagining things? Or do you think that
    this is so? I would be grateful for any help that you can give me
    in this. Union de prieres, Joyce Macnamara

    • I had never heard that story. I don’t think there’s any historical evidence for what you suggest, but does it matter? There is much more about Our Lord’s life and his blessed Mother for us to ponder.

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