The Monastery and the Internet

For those of you who would like to see the presentation I made to the Gott im Web Conference at Stift Heiligenkreuz, here it is. It takes just over 18 minutes and is a shortened version of what I had intended to say. Please bear in mind that it is addressed principally to monks and nuns. The question I was asked to talk about was The Monastery and the Internet: hiddenness and openness, cloister and mission.

The above video was viewed 133 times within a few hours of its release so we have upgraded our account to ensure there is less bandwidth choking. If it doesn’t work, please email us. If you would like to support the online work of the community, please consider making a donation via our Charity Choice account.

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17 thoughts on “The Monastery and the Internet”

  1. Sister, this was an outstandingly wise explanation of what it is that you and your Community are doing.

    It is very clear that you have all thought this through very well, prayed about it and continue to monitor your progress (and I speak as someone who has only recently finished teaching ICT at a large Benedictine boarding school and who is deeply interested in Benedictine Spirituality).

    I do hope that this very good work will may long continue. Everything you say is true, I can find no fault. Well done and Amen!

  2. What an interesting peice of work-and valuable for us as scholars and historians to consider the power of web both in terms of what was perceived as a goals of the internet and what has it evolved to. Your counsel about use of internet, consideration of the both/and nature of the process and assessing how to retain the nature of the monstastic experience while opening the virtual doors to share your collective work in Christ. Thank you for your observations and allowing us to participate with you in the work of the universal church.

  3. Thank you for sharing the video of your talk with your readers here. We must never take for granted the small miracle of web communication, which makes it possible. Nor take for granted all your community does to create and maintain a ‘monastic’ space on the web! (I am so pleased that your talk is in English and not German, else I’d be lost. )

  4. Thank you for this, it was fascinating. I have to say that the “always positive” emphasis of your posts shines out. I use it as a model for anything I say online.

  5. I have been encouraged to write our website, and now face the exciting possibilities of social media to enlarge our ‘audience’. Having taken up both blogging and twitter in addition to Facebook, for Lent, I am fairly confident with each; but would be delighted if you chose to post on how best to realise the potential of the interlinked media. how does one feed into another effectively – i.e. without merely repeating the same information – and most of all, how to find ways of linking in to a generation who use social media. [I have emailed all my 125+contacts inviting them to ‘like’ our page on Facebook, but only 4 have done so!]

    • If you do a search, you’ll find that I do sometimes post on that kind of topic but in general I leave it to our commercial side, Veilnet (we run a web development business to finance the monastery and its charitable undertakings. I try not to blur the borders because we usually charge a fee for that kind of skill-sharing.) This blog is only incidentally about the how-to of online engagement. It is meant to be online engagement in practice. Why not sign up for one of the media instruction days being promoted by Premier?

  6. Awesome message! In the time I have been following you on Twitter and here on your blog, you have had a large impact on my spiritual life. I am glad that you took the monastery to the internet.

    (and on an unrelated note… I love your accent!)

  7. Thank you, all. We are going to let the video stand until our latest £20 worth of video delivery bandwidth is used up, then it will disappear from your screens. (To date over 320 people have viewed the video but no one has yet made a donation towards the cost of putting it online, so you’ll understand why we are not keeping it here indefinitely.)

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