Feasts, Fasts and Fasting Diets

by Digitalnun on January 4, 2014

The rhythm of feasts and fasts is so central to the Church’s year and her understanding of the spiritual life that it may be worth gathering together a few thoughts on the subject. At the outset, we ought to distinguish between fasting in the traditional Christian sense and the popular ‘fasting diet’.

At its simplest, fasting means going without food and drink in order to remind ourselves of our creatureliness and enable us to focus on God more clearly. One might say that it has nothing to with us, but everything to do with God; and the fast of Jesus in the desert is the model for all our own fasting. The Lenten fast makes this very clear. The current discipline of the Church prescribes that on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday we should limit ourselves to one meal and two collations (snacks). This is both a penance (denying ourselves some good thing to show sorrow for our sins and ask grace for amendment in the future) and a preparation for what is to come. In the monastery, of course, the fasts are more frequent and more rigorous (for example, we fast every day during Lent, Sundays excepted) but the intention is the same. We seek the spiritual freedom that will enable us to follow the Lord more closely. Our fasting is meant to help us forget ourselves and our own comfort so that we are more open to God and others. The money we save is given to the poor. Any physical and psychological benefits are incidental. We might say that fasting as the Church understands it is essentially altruistic. The ‘fasting diet’ by contrast is primarily concerned with the health benefits for the dieter and, as a practice, has no larger end in view (though the individual may well have other motives for dieting in this way.)

When we come to feasts, the difference between Christian practice and secular custom becomes even more marked. The liturgical calendar highlights different occasions that throw light on our understanding of the central tenets of our faith. Sometimes, these seem to put us at odds, or at least out of step, with the people around us. During Christmastide, for example, we are still celebrating when others have taken down their Christmas decorations because it is Epiphany, rather than Christmas Day itself, which opens the way of salvation to gentile Christians. The greatest feast of all, that of Easter, is ushered in by a fast so that we feel in our own bodies the movement from darkness to light, but it is a feast that has very little razzmatazz surrounding it. The great mystery of the Eucharist is a feast in which we share by means of a morsel of bread and a sip of wine transformed into the sacred Body and Blood of Christ.

As we approach the last few days of the Christmas season and the thought of Lent begins to appear on the horizon, perhaps we could spend a few moments reflecting on the nature of feasts and fasts and the way we ourselves live them. The Rule of St Benedict is written around the feast of Easter. Everything is referred to that, and the joy and spiritual gladness that should accompany our every action should ensure our lives have a continual Lenten quality. As our American friends would say, go figure.

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3 comments

I miss the feast days and Holy Days of Obligation and the Friday fasting that was part of my Catholic Heritage. Many feast days are now translated to Sundays, although I’ve been fortunate enough to find Churches that do celebrate feasts on the actual date that they fall.

I still try to keep to my Catholic heritage in this and fast when appropriate, despite being an Anglican. But I was pleasantly surprised to find that many older Anglicans share the Catholic feast days and obligations in exactly the same way. That demonstrates that we share more than we differ.

I love Lent and have already got my Lent Book ‘Barefoot Prayers’ by Stephen Cherry and will be following that for the whole of Lent, it’s fascinating to do this with a different book each year and in the last two, I’ve shared this with my Spiritual Director.

I will be offering the prayers of intercession in my new parish this Sunday and Epiphany being central to my thoughts.

Prayers for your community and ministry as we move towards the great feast of Easter.

by UKViewer on Saturday, 4 January, 2014 at 9:22 am. #

Congratulations on your award;well deserved. may you go on to inspire many more people for good and God’s glory!

by Elizabeth Sadler on Saturday, 4 January, 2014 at 10:22 am. #


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