Tuesday of Holy Weeek 2013: Varieties of Betrayal

by Digitalnun on March 26, 2013

Today we read the gospel of the betrayal at Mass. When we come to the words ‘Night had fallen,’ we know that the darkness which envelops us is within as well as without. There are many varieties of betrayal, not all of them as easy to identify as that of Judas. The ‘white lie’, the covert act of selfishness, the shabby evasion of responsibility, even the unconvincing ‘justifications’ we concoct in our pathetic attempts to excuse ourselves to ourselves, they are all a betrayal of what we know to be true. Today is a day to think about the ways in which we who acknowledge Jesus as Lord and Saviour betray him by adopting ways of behaviour inconsistent with the gospel — not to beat ourselves up about them, but to ask mercy and forgiveness and firm purpose of amendment.

The tragedy of Judas is that he finally saw the awfulness of what he had done but forgot the infinite mercy and compassion of God.

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3 comments

Thank you for this.

by claire bangasser on Tuesday, 26 March, 2013 at 12:17 pm. #

Lord, have mercy on us.

by Margaret Yo on Tuesday, 26 March, 2013 at 1:24 pm. #

“The tragedy of Judas is that he finally saw the awfulness of what he had done but forgot the infinite mercy and compassion of God.”

I have a hunch that Judas also realised the awfulness of public shame: the pointing fingers, the recriminations of the ‘chosen band’, the grief of a bereaved Mother. Judas’ life would always be tainted with private and public memories of what he had done.

The infinite mercy of God may well be able to cleanse us from our guilt; but public shame can be something else again.

by Andy on Wednesday, 27 March, 2013 at 10:19 pm. #


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