Our Need of Holiness

by Digitalnun on December 18, 2012

Having posted on today’s O antiphon, ‘O Adonai’, every year since I began blogging, I thought I would give both you and me a rest; but I find I can’t, because our need of holiness, of redemption, of the gift of prayer, grows ever greater. So, you will find the text, translation, music and some scriptural notes here, and if you want to know what I’ve said in previous years, please type ‘O Adonai’ into the search box on the right.

What strikes me this morning is the humility of holiness. God could have impressed Moses with a sense of his infinite transcendence in many ways, but he chose to capture his attention using a burning bush. Moses’ curiosity led him to God; and only after he had heard God speak did he realise that he was on holy ground. Prayer is rather like that. We tend to think that we are calling on God, only to realise later that God first called to us; and just as Moses’ life was transformed by his encounter with the mysterious presence at the heart of the burning bush, so our lives too are transformed by the encounter with God in prayer.

Sometimes we try to avoid prayer because we are afraid of what God may ask of us. We try to run away like Jonah, or we get into a huff like Naaman because things don’t go the way we expect and want. Sometimes we just give up on it because it seems too hard or unrewarding. We want to be mystics and have wonderful supernatural experiences and forget that, for most people, most of the time,  prayer is a much humbler, much more plodding business. There is no mystery about prayer, although prayer draws us into the heart of a great Mystery. God speaks to us where we are, in the desert of our lives, through the ordinary and everyday much more often than through the strange and spectacular. Our job is to listen and allow ourselves to be transformed: God will not force us. We tend to overlook that, because we have never quite understood the humility of God.

The prayer we make in today’s antiphon requires our consent to be answered — the searing holiness of God desires our redemption, but only if we will allow it. To have such power over God is the paradox of being human.

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5 comments

Your para about avoiding prayer because of a fear of what God may ask of us really hit home with me – as do so very many of your posts.

by StanFirth on Tuesday, 18 December, 2012 at 9:05 am. #

If it home with you, Stan, it’s because it first hit home with me, if you see what I mean.

by Digitalnun on Tuesday, 18 December, 2012 at 9:15 am. #

Thank you for confirming what has taken me many decades to realise: that prayer is more about listening to God than asking Him to grant our wishes. He knows our needs and we must be prepared to follow where He leads.

by John F Smith on Tuesday, 18 December, 2012 at 10:28 am. #

Hitting home here as well. I’ve been doubting myself, so it comes as a relief that I am not alone in this. Not sure I would have been brave enough to voice it on my own.

by Margaret on Tuesday, 18 December, 2012 at 4:59 pm. #

Now that I know that I am in prayer whatever I do, I am much more relaxed about praying and prayer time.

God speaks to us where we are, in the desert of our lives, through the ordinary and everyday much more often than through the strange and spectacular.

Yes! Thank you.

by claire on Tuesday, 18 December, 2012 at 8:54 pm. #


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