Abortion, Rape and the Catholic Church

by Digitalnun on February 19, 2011

A thoughtful question posed in a comment to yesterday’s post (Cannibal Cups and our Squeamish Sensibility) is my reason for writing about this subject. I hope that what I say will stimulate reflection and debate, and that the debate will be conducted with sensitivity. The last thing I should wish to do is cause pain to those who have been raped or who have suffered an abortion.

First, a few words about myself. Long ago, before I became a nun, I used to play an active part in Life which, at that time, had a very clear and simple response to abortion. Essentially, we said that people had to have a choice and the only way that a real choice could be offered was by ensuring that anyone who was pregnant had somewhere to live and all the support needed to bring her child safely into the world. Many of the people we tried to help were deeply afraid: of violent partners, hostile parents, their own inadequacy to cope with parenthood. We provided ‘safe houses’ and on-going help.  I can recall only one woman who said she had become pregnant because of rape, but I’m sure there were others, and probably instances of incest also. I state this because one very good question is, ‘how much do you know about the subject?’ and in my case the answer is ‘very little, but possibly slightly more than some others’.

Next, we need to consider what the Catholic Church actually teaches. It starts, not with a negative, but a huge positive: all life is sacred, and in the case of human life, that life begins at conception. This teaching is based on scripture and natural law. The problem with natural law is that not everyone believes there is such a thing, i.e. a self-evident truth which is accessible by reason and is not dependent on religious belief. If you are prepared to give the time, one of the best accounts of what Catholics believe is in Pope John Paul II’s 1995 encyclical, Evangelium Vitae, (The Gospel of Life). In section 60 the pope says, ‘From the time that the ovum is fertilized, a life is begun which is neither that of the father nor the mother; it is rather the life of a new human being with his own growth…[M]odern genetic science offers clear confirmation. It has demonstrated that from the first instant there is established the programme of what this living being will be.’ Read that, and then read what obstetric textbooks say about the beginning of human life. The fact that the viability of life outside the womb is being pushed further and further back seems to me to underline the fact that the answer to the question ‘when does life begin’ is susceptible of only one answer: at conception.

The Catholic Church is entirely consistent in its attitude to the sanctity of life. As Donum Vitae puts it, ‘It is the inviolable right of every innocent being to life.’ (That’s also a reason why the Church is unhappy with capital punishment: there have been so many instances of innocent lives being taken.) We simply don’t have the right to take innocent human life; and that’s something that allows of no exceptions or we get into the business of valuing one life more than another. A child conceived by rape is still a child and has as much right to life as a child conceived by loving parents; so too does a child who has some physical or mental deformity. Our value as human beings does not depend upon our being perfect according to some arbitrary standard imposed by other human beings.

So, we come to the distressing case of someone, woman or child, who has conceived because of rape. Do we say, ‘The circumstances are so awful and the suffering will be so great that abortion is allowable’? or do we say, ‘This is terrible. We must do all we can to help the woman and her child, and go on helping, because there are two lives here and both are sacred’? The Catholic response is the second. Please note that it has two parts.

It says first of all that rape is a terrible wrong inflicted on another. One of the problems we face in western society is that rape has somehow been trivialised. No one I have ever spoken to who has been raped would agree that rape is trivial. That is a message we need to get across loud and clear, and I’m not convinced that the Church has done a very good job on that. Secondly, it says that there are two lives to be considered and we do not have the right to choose between them. On the whole, the Church has done better with that, but it has not always stressed sufficiently that its teaching makes other demands on the Catholic community. If we are to uphold the Church’s teaching about abortion we must also uphold her teaching about the duty to help and support those in need.

I am sure that this post will seem harsh to many. I have not been in the situation I describe and do not know, from the inside, what it is like, but I still believe that what I have written is true. Sometimes when Catholics talk about abortion they give me the shivers. What comes across is the moral absolute, not the reverence or compassion which should be an integral part of it. There are no easy answers to hard questions like those posed yesterday. We have to live with that and do the best we can. Pray today for all who find themselves facing an unwanted pregnancy — and dig deep in your pockets and your compassion.

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5 comments

I absolutely agree with your blog.The Church’s problem is twofold.1. People have lost respect for the Church for various reasons some historical and others current .
Birth control MUST be addressed. Most of the World disagree with the Church.
I know this is not rape prompted per say but part of the wider issue.

by Alexander on Saturday, 19 February, 2011 at 9:10 am. #

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by Tweets that mention Abortion, Rape and the Catholic Church « iBenedictines -- Topsy.com on Monday, 21 February, 2011 at 2:01 am. #

Sister,

Thank you so much for writing this.

I was moved to tears as I came to the end of it – moved by your compassion.

As you seem to be saying, this compassion seems so lacking in the words (and actions) of many who oppose abortion. So much of their focus is solely on the ‘new life’, with none to spare for the woman (or girl). They claim to oppose abortion on the basis that all life is equal but their very attitude towards the raped woman – or girl – declares the opposite.

Your invocation to ‘dig deep in your pockets and your compassion’ is spot-on.

I know someone who was in this situation. I did not know her at the time but I came to know her later, the event that had occurred and her response to it.

And may I say that I agree with the earlier poster – I believe the Church will eventually re-address its stance on contraception. Pope Benedict’s recent(ish) comments regarding condom use by male prostitutes seemed to offer a chink of light, however small.

by Golder on Monday, 21 February, 2011 at 3:26 pm. #

Thank you for your comments. This is a difficult subject to write about but infinitely harder to live with. Let us pray.

by Digitalnun on Wednesday, 23 February, 2011 at 6:43 am. #

Thank you Sister for helping me further understand the Catholic Church’s view on this issue

by Guadalupe on Saturday, 23 April, 2011 at 12:32 am. #


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